Packages and Binaries:

tftp

Tftp is the user interface to the Internet TFTP (Trivial File Transfer Protocol), which allows users to transfer files to and from a remote machine. The remote host may be specified on the command line, in which case tftp uses host as the default host for future transfers.

Installed size: 53 KB
How to install: sudo apt install tftp

  • libc6
  • netbase
tftp

Trivial file transfer program

root@kali:~# man tftp
TFTP(1)                   BSD General Commands Manual                  TFTP(1)

NAME
     tftp -- trivial file transfer program

SYNOPSIS
     tftp [host]

DESCRIPTION
     Tftp is the user interface to the Internet TFTP (Trivial File Transfer
     Protocol), which allows users to transfer files to and from a remote ma-
     chine.  The remote host may be specified on the command line, in which
     case tftp uses host as the default host for future transfers (see the
     connect command below).

COMMANDS
     Once tftp is running, it issues the prompt "tftp> " and recognizes the
     following commands:

     ? command-name ...
              Print help information.

     ascii    Shorthand for "mode ascii"

     binary   Shorthand for "mode binary"

     connect host-name [port]
              Set the host (and optionally port) for transfers.  Note that the
              TFTP protocol, unlike the FTP protocol, does not maintain con-
              nections betwen transfers; thus, the connect command does not
              actually create a connection, but merely remembers what host is
              to be used for transfers.  You do not have to use the connect
              command; the remote host can be specified as part of the get or
              put commands.

     get filename
     get remotename localname
     get file1 file2 ... fileN
              Get a file or set of files from the specified sources.  Source
              can be in one of two forms: a filename on the remote host, if
              the host has already been specified, or a string of the form
              hosts:filename to specify both a host and filename at the same
              time.  If the latter form is used, the last hostname specified
              becomes the default for future transfers.

     mode transfer-mode
              Set the mode for transfers; transfer-mode may be one of ascii or
              binary.  The default is ascii.

     put file
     put localfile remotefile
     put file1 file2 ... fileN remote-directory
              Put a file or set of files to the specified remote file or di-
              rectory.  The destination can be in one of two forms: a filename
              on the remote host, if the host has already been specified, or a
              string of the form hosts:filename to specify both a host and
              filename at the same time.  If the latter form is used, the
              hostname specified becomes the default for future transfers.  If
              the remote-directory form is used, the remote host is assumed to
              be a UNIX machine.

     quit     Exit tftp.  An end of file also exits.

     rexmt retransmission-timeout
              Set the per-packet retransmission timeout, in seconds.

     status   Show current status.

     timeout total-transmission-timeout
              Set the total transmission timeout, in seconds.

     trace    Toggle packet tracing.

     verbose  Toggle verbose mode.

BUGS
     Because there is no user-login or validation within the TFTP protocol,
     the remote site will probably have some sort of file-access restrictions
     in place.  The exact methods are specific to each site and therefore dif-
     ficult to document here.

HISTORY
     The tftp command appeared in 4.3BSD.

Linux NetKit (0.17)             August 15, 1999            Linux NetKit (0.17)

tftp

Trivial file transfer program

root@kali:~# man tftp
TFTP(1)                   BSD General Commands Manual                  TFTP(1)

NAME
     tftp -- trivial file transfer program

SYNOPSIS
     tftp [host]

DESCRIPTION
     Tftp is the user interface to the Internet TFTP (Trivial File Transfer
     Protocol), which allows users to transfer files to and from a remote ma-
     chine.  The remote host may be specified on the command line, in which
     case tftp uses host as the default host for future transfers (see the
     connect command below).

COMMANDS
     Once tftp is running, it issues the prompt "tftp> " and recognizes the
     following commands:

     ? command-name ...
              Print help information.

     ascii    Shorthand for "mode ascii"

     binary   Shorthand for "mode binary"

     connect host-name [port]
              Set the host (and optionally port) for transfers.  Note that the
              TFTP protocol, unlike the FTP protocol, does not maintain con-
              nections betwen transfers; thus, the connect command does not
              actually create a connection, but merely remembers what host is
              to be used for transfers.  You do not have to use the connect
              command; the remote host can be specified as part of the get or
              put commands.

     get filename
     get remotename localname
     get file1 file2 ... fileN
              Get a file or set of files from the specified sources.  Source
              can be in one of two forms: a filename on the remote host, if
              the host has already been specified, or a string of the form
              hosts:filename to specify both a host and filename at the same
              time.  If the latter form is used, the last hostname specified
              becomes the default for future transfers.

     mode transfer-mode
              Set the mode for transfers; transfer-mode may be one of ascii or
              binary.  The default is ascii.

     put file
     put localfile remotefile
     put file1 file2 ... fileN remote-directory
              Put a file or set of files to the specified remote file or di-
              rectory.  The destination can be in one of two forms: a filename
              on the remote host, if the host has already been specified, or a
              string of the form hosts:filename to specify both a host and
              filename at the same time.  If the latter form is used, the
              hostname specified becomes the default for future transfers.  If
              the remote-directory form is used, the remote host is assumed to
              be a UNIX machine.

     quit     Exit tftp.  An end of file also exits.

     rexmt retransmission-timeout
              Set the per-packet retransmission timeout, in seconds.

     status   Show current status.

     timeout total-transmission-timeout
              Set the total transmission timeout, in seconds.

     trace    Toggle packet tracing.

     verbose  Toggle verbose mode.

BUGS
     Because there is no user-login or validation within the TFTP protocol,
     the remote site will probably have some sort of file-access restrictions
     in place.  The exact methods are specific to each site and therefore dif-
     ficult to document here.

HISTORY
     The tftp command appeared in 4.3BSD.

Linux NetKit (0.17)             August 15, 1999            Linux NetKit (0.17)

tftpd

Tftpd is a server which supports the Internet Trivial File Transfer Protocol (RFC 783). The TFTP server operates at the port indicated in the `tftp' service description; see services(5). The server is normally started by inetd(8).

Warning: Does not support ‘tsize’, which is required by some tftp clients, especially PXE, and various other network boot clients. For those, use atftpd or tftpd-hpa.

Installed size: 50 KB
How to install: sudo apt install tftpd

  • libc6
  • openbsd-inetd | inet-superserver
in.tftpd

DARPA Trivial File Transfer Protocol server

root@kali:~# man in.tftpd
TFTPD(8)                  BSD System Manager's Manual                 TFTPD(8)

NAME
     tftpd -- DARPA Trivial File Transfer Protocol server

SYNOPSIS
     tftpd [-n] [-s] [directory ...]

DESCRIPTION
     Tftpd is a server which supports the DARPA Trivial File Transfer Proto-
     col.  The TFTP server operates at the port indicated in the 'tftp' ser-
     vice description; see services(5).  The server is normally started by
     inetd(8).

     The use of tftp(1) does not require an account or password on the remote
     system.  Due to the lack of authentication information, tftpd will allow
     only publicly readable files to be accessed.  Files may be written only
     if they already exist and are publicly writable.  Note that this extends
     the concept of "public" to include all users on all hosts that can be
     reached through the network; this may not be appropriate on all systems,
     and its implications should be considered before enabling tftp service.
     The server should have the user ID with the lowest possible privilege.

     Access to files may be controlled by invoking tftpd with a list of direc-
     tories by including pathnames as server program arguments in
     /etc/inetd.conf.  In this case access is restricted to files whose names
     are prefixed by the one of the given directories. If no directories are
     supplied the default is /tftpboot.  To give out access to the whole
     filesystem, should this be desired for some reason, supply / as an argu-
     ment.

     Unfortunately, on multi-homed systems, it is impossible for tftpd to de-
     termine the address on which a packet was received. As a result, tftpd
     uses two different mechanisms to guess the best source address to use for
     replies. If the socket that inetd(8) passed to tftpd is bound to a par-
     ticular address, tftpd uses that address for replies. Otherwise, tftpd
     uses ``UDP connect'' to let the kernel choose the reply address based on
     the destination of the replies and the routing tables. This means that
     most setups will work transparently, while in cases where the reply ad-
     dress must be fixed, the virtual hosting feature of inetd(8) can be used
     to ensure that replies go out from the correct address.  These considera-
     tions are important, because most tftp clients will reject reply packets
     that appear to come from an unexpected address.

     The options are:

     -n      Suppresses negative acknowledgement of requests for nonexistent
             relative filenames.

     -s      All absolute filenames are treated as if they were preceded by
             the first directory argument, or /tftpboot if there is none.

SEE ALSO
     tftp(1), inetd(8)

HISTORY
     The tftpd command appeared in 4.2BSD.

Linux NetKit (0.17)              July 29, 2000             Linux NetKit (0.17)

in.tftpd

DARPA Trivial File Transfer Protocol server

root@kali:~# man in.tftpd
TFTPD(8)                  BSD System Manager's Manual                 TFTPD(8)

NAME
     tftpd -- DARPA Trivial File Transfer Protocol server

SYNOPSIS
     tftpd [-n] [-s] [directory ...]

DESCRIPTION
     Tftpd is a server which supports the DARPA Trivial File Transfer Proto-
     col.  The TFTP server operates at the port indicated in the 'tftp' ser-
     vice description; see services(5).  The server is normally started by
     inetd(8).

     The use of tftp(1) does not require an account or password on the remote
     system.  Due to the lack of authentication information, tftpd will allow
     only publicly readable files to be accessed.  Files may be written only
     if they already exist and are publicly writable.  Note that this extends
     the concept of "public" to include all users on all hosts that can be
     reached through the network; this may not be appropriate on all systems,
     and its implications should be considered before enabling tftp service.
     The server should have the user ID with the lowest possible privilege.

     Access to files may be controlled by invoking tftpd with a list of direc-
     tories by including pathnames as server program arguments in
     /etc/inetd.conf.  In this case access is restricted to files whose names
     are prefixed by the one of the given directories. If no directories are
     supplied the default is /tftpboot.  To give out access to the whole
     filesystem, should this be desired for some reason, supply / as an argu-
     ment.

     Unfortunately, on multi-homed systems, it is impossible for tftpd to de-
     termine the address on which a packet was received. As a result, tftpd
     uses two different mechanisms to guess the best source address to use for
     replies. If the socket that inetd(8) passed to tftpd is bound to a par-
     ticular address, tftpd uses that address for replies. Otherwise, tftpd
     uses ``UDP connect'' to let the kernel choose the reply address based on
     the destination of the replies and the routing tables. This means that
     most setups will work transparently, while in cases where the reply ad-
     dress must be fixed, the virtual hosting feature of inetd(8) can be used
     to ensure that replies go out from the correct address.  These considera-
     tions are important, because most tftp clients will reject reply packets
     that appear to come from an unexpected address.

     The options are:

     -n      Suppresses negative acknowledgement of requests for nonexistent
             relative filenames.

     -s      All absolute filenames are treated as if they were preceded by
             the first directory argument, or /tftpboot if there is none.

SEE ALSO
     tftp(1), inetd(8)

HISTORY
     The tftpd command appeared in 4.2BSD.

Linux NetKit (0.17)              July 29, 2000             Linux NetKit (0.17)

in.tftpd

DARPA Trivial File Transfer Protocol server

root@kali:~# man in.tftpd
TFTPD(8)                  BSD System Manager's Manual                 TFTPD(8)

NAME
     tftpd -- DARPA Trivial File Transfer Protocol server

SYNOPSIS
     tftpd [-n] [-s] [directory ...]

DESCRIPTION
     Tftpd is a server which supports the DARPA Trivial File Transfer Proto-
     col.  The TFTP server operates at the port indicated in the 'tftp' ser-
     vice description; see services(5).  The server is normally started by
     inetd(8).

     The use of tftp(1) does not require an account or password on the remote
     system.  Due to the lack of authentication information, tftpd will allow
     only publicly readable files to be accessed.  Files may be written only
     if they already exist and are publicly writable.  Note that this extends
     the concept of "public" to include all users on all hosts that can be
     reached through the network; this may not be appropriate on all systems,
     and its implications should be considered before enabling tftp service.
     The server should have the user ID with the lowest possible privilege.

     Access to files may be controlled by invoking tftpd with a list of direc-
     tories by including pathnames as server program arguments in
     /etc/inetd.conf.  In this case access is restricted to files whose names
     are prefixed by the one of the given directories. If no directories are
     supplied the default is /tftpboot.  To give out access to the whole
     filesystem, should this be desired for some reason, supply / as an argu-
     ment.

     Unfortunately, on multi-homed systems, it is impossible for tftpd to de-
     termine the address on which a packet was received. As a result, tftpd
     uses two different mechanisms to guess the best source address to use for
     replies. If the socket that inetd(8) passed to tftpd is bound to a par-
     ticular address, tftpd uses that address for replies. Otherwise, tftpd
     uses ``UDP connect'' to let the kernel choose the reply address based on
     the destination of the replies and the routing tables. This means that
     most setups will work transparently, while in cases where the reply ad-
     dress must be fixed, the virtual hosting feature of inetd(8) can be used
     to ensure that replies go out from the correct address.  These considera-
     tions are important, because most tftp clients will reject reply packets
     that appear to come from an unexpected address.

     The options are:

     -n      Suppresses negative acknowledgement of requests for nonexistent
             relative filenames.

     -s      All absolute filenames are treated as if they were preceded by
             the first directory argument, or /tftpboot if there is none.

SEE ALSO
     tftp(1), inetd(8)

HISTORY
     The tftpd command appeared in 4.2BSD.

Linux NetKit (0.17)              July 29, 2000             Linux NetKit (0.17)

Updated on: 2021-Sep-16